Earning potential

So what is the average earning potential of a broker within this business? with several factors involved giving a direct fixed answer is not as simple as one may think with variables such as location, type of trade, level of experience, indeed whether you work alone or for a brokerage, to name but a few but suffice to say regardless, the overall income bracket is something truly different from anything you may well have experienced.
 
That said, let's go right ahead and put this into perspective and give you an idea of the benefits and potential salary you can earn.

The sheer potential for earning within this industry is so vast, that its no wonder that it's been a well guarded secret for well over two centuries!
Dr.Richard Heneghan, Professor of Business and Economics


In a recent statistic the average service sector employee's salary (not international traders) in the UK for instance, ranges from between £30,000 to £50,000 annually. Now, considering everything like tax, living expenses, family, travel, bills, and everything else that sucks the average workers pocket dry, what can that average person expect to be left with at the end of the year? We're talking here about clear savings, net savings at the end of the financial year, well the answer is not very much at all, meaning they continue that annual grind of working for someone and earning a living, and if there are salary cuts, well there's not much apart from seeking a new career the average worker can do in order to improve their financial circumstance.

So what can you realistically expect?
As someone recently graduated from Learn Global Trade and now working as a freelance trader what can I honestly expect?

Typical Scenario
An average sugar deal between a buyer an seller, facilitated by a trained broker. The contract is for 10,000 metric tonnes a month for 1 year which is actually considered standard. It's worth mentioning that 25,000, 50,000 and 100,000 metric tonnes monthly shipments are also common within this industry, but to make it digestible, let's stick to a bare minimum of 10,000 metric tonnes.
 
So the above scenario, a typical trade being 10,000 metric tonnes of sugar per month being sold over a one year contract, with a typical broker facilitating this expecting to make for themselves anything from $1.00 to $5.00 'per metric tonne' in commission. Let's say for arguments sake, it's $1 per tonne commission and everything has gone according to plan, and the contracts have been signed, all protocols have been met and approved, the broker is looking based on a minimum of $1.00 per tonne, to be earning themselves $10,000 per month for the next year, and all from only 1 single trade, sounds too good to be true? well it's real and again you now begin to understand why this industry has been kept private for almost two centuries in the hands of rich merchant traders and let's face it, greedy bankers.
 
That said, consider the average broker is working on anything up to 5 trades a month, and more, so a simple common sense calculation can quite easily show the vast potential within the industry, and with literally countless hundreds of thousands of transactions on a daily basis, you can begin to see how this industry as a rule of thumb, is the single most lucrative industry on the planet, and responsible for the continual movement of the global economy, yet not effected at all by any recession or economic problems.
 
Now, going back in comparison to the average worker earning themselves perhaps £30,000 annually, minus his expenses and taxes, who do you think will be better of in the long run? The answers is simple, and anyone who can do basic mathematics can quite easily work the answer out.

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